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Many Who See My Work




I've been building The Lego Church Project annually now for twenty-five years. Fact is many who see my work with "The Project" only see it for what it is on the surface. A rather large building using a children's toy. On that basic level that is not an unfair understanding. I build a massive mini-figure scale building of my own design using LEGO. This is a building toy (or system as the company calls it) that is often associated with children. Yet looking more closely at what I'm doing. You realize that their is more to my story.


LEGO is enjoyed by millions of people across all age ranges. A very useful medium for artists young and old. In fact their is an entire fandom called the "Adult Fans of LEGO" (AFOL). You see this on various blogs dedicated to builders across the entire world. While it is fair to think that LEGO is just mostly for children. This is not quiet true. Even LEGO (the company) has started to release sets catered to more adults. For me it is a creative medium that I enjoy using. Allowing me to explore my own path.


The Project builds, however, only tell part of a bigger story. What is not easily seen or noticed is the level of challenge that is involved. Taking endless and countless hours to build and rebuild sections. All from the ideas that are flowing inside my mind. To build anything of this nature requires a level of visualization and planning that, for me, can be very difficult. The only way I've been able to do this for so long and so well is mainly though past experience and a decent memory of previous builds. Part of the disability that I face means that I don't learn things easily. New items can be more of a challenge than they need to be. Even tasks that may seem easy for some can be difficult for me. Such as learning the tenor part of a song that we are singing in the choir.


Another aspect of my work that is often overlooked is the deep commitment to prayer. As I am building I am praying. Often using my hands. I take all the issues on my heart and put them into the work before me. I have figures that represent many kinds of disabilities. Along with understanding that not everyone's challenges are easily seen or noticed. A prayer for the parishes struggling with attendance. Prayers for those who are struggling in life. Prayers for our Priests and that more men would answer the call to the priesthood. Prayer is the foundation of my work and I hope it is reflected in the bricks.


Even with all the challenges that I face every season. This is something that I am willing to do. It ties to a mission that I started in the early days of my work. I'm showing that no matter what challenge or disability you face God can still use your talents. Often times in amazing and creative ways. Many who have chance to come across my work do not realize the daily challenges that I have to contend with. Such as the balance issues thanks to the cerebral palsy. Every issue that I face has some kind of role to play in what I do with The Project and that keeps me motivated. Even when I run into issues in trying to find parishes willing to host me and my work.


The displays are an important part of what I do and come from a deep desire to share my talents with others. Something like The Lego Church Project is not meant to be hidden from view. Not meant to be locked away and held on to like some secret treasure. God calls on us to use our talents. So that means our talents should be shared with those around us. That is why I love doing the displays. It allows me to show my work and my talents with everyone.


As you look at my work. On the surface it is a giant building using a children's toy as an art medium. However when you take a closer look at the bricks. You realize that my work shares a deeper history and that their is indeed way more to my story. -


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